• DIY Iron Furnace Build

    I made a small furnace for casting iron and stainless steel. It uses the same burner as my aluminum furnace but takes about 2 hours to heat up( a .75GPH nozzle is in the mail). If you wanted to save fuel simply coating ceramic blanket in santanite or Itc-100 might be better. I wanted something more robust, the refractory is very heavy and rated to 3000F. I should be able to push it a bit but the crucible won't quite cut it. I'll likely need one that's rated higher and can be capped and flooded with argon. Crucible - A10 Clay graphite (Purchased on ebay) Fuel- Start on propane, than switch to diesel I'm pretty happy with it and some of my castings have come out nice(video on that later) but they do rust quick unpainted. If you have any suggestions let me know. I got the Cast-O-lite ...
  • Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

    Making iron, Edwardian "bush" style. "A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. Iron ore melted in makeshift furnace. Tudor blast furnace: http://youtu.be/v46lzPosC1g?t=38m56s From Edwardian Farm: Charcoal burn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yK0rLQa3j4 For however long it lasts--the 'Edwardian Farm' and 'Victorian Farm' documentaries are available on this channel: BBC...
  • Homemade Furnace Part one: design and construction

    I build a new furnace so that I can hopefully melt iron. Next week I will upload videos of testing and operation of the furnace.
  • How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

    I have made another video on how to make the propane burner in this video click onto the link, http://youtu.be/l697pB9X5TI
  • How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

    How to hack flashlight batteries and a fire brick, into a desktop arc reaction chamber. ...For hobby metal melting, and for science! Subscribe for new videos every 5 days! http://bit.ly/TKoRSubscribe Join my email list! http://bit.ly/TKOREmailList For other project videos, check out http://www.thekingofrandom.com Social Media Links: Google+: http://bit.ly/plusgrant Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBTheKingOfRandom Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstaGrant Twitter: http://bit.ly/tweetgrant Pinterest: http://bit.ly/pingrant Tumblr: http://bit.ly/grantstumblr Endcard Links: Micro Welder: http://bit.ly/HomemadeStickWelder Laser Blowgun: http://bit.ly/LaserBlowgun Magic Mud: http://bit.ly/MagicMud Matchbox Rockets: http://bit.ly/MatchboxRockets Music By: Scott & Brendo (“Photographs” - Instrumental...
  • Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

    Jeff Pringle and Jim Austin are conducting a Viking-Age Bloomery Iron Smelt in West Oakland, CA. Iron oxide ore is reduced in the furnace to iron. Impurities are removed as molten slag by tapping. The result is a big bloom that can be forged and consolidated using traditional blacksmithing techniques.
  • Feeding the Celtic iron furnace http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/

    Thijs van de Manakker and his smelting team at an archaeological experiment in 1999 at the Prehistorisch Huis Eindhoven. Part 2 of 5
  • Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore www.ThijsvandeManakker.com

    Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore Part 1 of 5 Lejre Rapport: www.thijsvandemanakker. com/WeblogEnglish.htm
  • Bloomery - Ancient Mobile Furnace

    A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. A bloomery consists of a pit or chimney with heat-resistant walls made of earth, clay, or stone. Near the bottom, one or more pipes (made of clay or metal) enter through the side walls. These pipes, called tuyères, allow air to enter the furnace, either by natural draught, or forced with bellows or a trompe. An opening at the bottom of t...
  • C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

    Cast iron is made by re-melting pig iron, often along with substantial quantities of scrap iron, scrap steel, limestone, carbon (coke) and taking various steps to remove undesirable contaminants. Phosphorus and sulfur may be burnt out of the molten iron, but this also burns out the carbon, which must be replaced. Depending on the application, carbon and silicon content are adjusted to the desired levels, which may be anywhere from 2–3.5% and 1–3%, respectively. Other elements are then added to the melt before the final form is produced by casting
DIY Iron Furnace Build

DIY Iron Furnace Build

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:55
  • Updated: 06 Oct 2014
  • views: 385015
videos
I made a small furnace for casting iron and stainless steel. It uses the same burner as my aluminum furnace but takes about 2 hours to heat up( a .75GPH nozzle is in the mail). If you wanted to save fuel simply coating ceramic blanket in santanite or Itc-100 might be better. I wanted something more robust, the refractory is very heavy and rated to 3000F. I should be able to push it a bit but the crucible won't quite cut it. I'll likely need one that's rated higher and can be capped and flooded with argon. Crucible - A10 Clay graphite (Purchased on ebay) Fuel- Start on propane, than switch to diesel I'm pretty happy with it and some of my castings have come out nice(video on that later) but they do rust quick unpainted. If you have any suggestions let me know. I got the Cast-O-lite 30 off ebay + some mizzou plus for plinths and the 2600F ceramic blanket I made all the foundry tools with hardware store steel The 10 gallon barrel was free and stays touchable even when the pour is molten! This is really dangerous, the molten iron can go right through just about anything. Start with aluminum before going up to iron. The fumes are bad, the heat will melt flesh, the fuel tank could explode the crucible could rupture, the pour could hit water. You really need to be careful
wn.com/Diy Iron Furnace Build
Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:36
  • Updated: 22 Jan 2011
  • views: 25207
videos
Making iron, Edwardian "bush" style. "A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. Iron ore melted in makeshift furnace. Tudor blast furnace: http://youtu.be/v46lzPosC1g?t=38m56s From Edwardian Farm: Charcoal burn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yK0rLQa3j4 For however long it lasts--the 'Edwardian Farm' and 'Victorian Farm' documentaries are available on this channel: BBC Farm series: Tales from the Green Valley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSpqpwJ__Ek&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FUA6S_xLEwRkc6ygmij5xQ Tudor Monastery Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1ERDYjsHBg&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FUg-3jbfHILhh6JFtnj7uq Victorian Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5T2TU-Na_c&list=PLrYzzr8yja6F2f4_hxuK2T3pF8XgD82Zw Edwardian Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcBl4_2FJX4&list=PLrYzzr8yja6E-5y2gUvJNlI3eBobkbFs5 Wartime Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hou91pLDvDs&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FjTvB4yJp41J6-ebSJJ37Z
wn.com/Iron Furnace Bush Style Bloomery
Homemade Furnace Part one: design and construction

Homemade Furnace Part one: design and construction

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:21
  • Updated: 13 Jun 2014
  • views: 36503
videos
I build a new furnace so that I can hopefully melt iron. Next week I will upload videos of testing and operation of the furnace.
wn.com/Homemade Furnace Part One Design And Construction
How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:15
  • Updated: 19 Oct 2012
  • views: 355186
videos
I have made another video on how to make the propane burner in this video click onto the link, http://youtu.be/l697pB9X5TI
wn.com/How To Build A Small Cast Iron Melting Furnace.
How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:41
  • Updated: 05 Mar 2015
  • views: 6259245
videos
How to hack flashlight batteries and a fire brick, into a desktop arc reaction chamber. ...For hobby metal melting, and for science! Subscribe for new videos every 5 days! http://bit.ly/TKoRSubscribe Join my email list! http://bit.ly/TKOREmailList For other project videos, check out http://www.thekingofrandom.com Social Media Links: Google+: http://bit.ly/plusgrant Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBTheKingOfRandom Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstaGrant Twitter: http://bit.ly/tweetgrant Pinterest: http://bit.ly/pingrant Tumblr: http://bit.ly/grantstumblr Endcard Links: Micro Welder: http://bit.ly/HomemadeStickWelder Laser Blowgun: http://bit.ly/LaserBlowgun Magic Mud: http://bit.ly/MagicMud Matchbox Rockets: http://bit.ly/MatchboxRockets Music By: Scott & Brendo (“Photographs” - Instrumental) http://bit.ly/ScottBrendoiTunes Project Inspired By: This project was originally inspired by Theo Grey and his book, "Mad Science". After seeing the concept, I couldn't find any information anywhere on the internet or in libraries about arc furnace experiments, so I set out on my own to achieve these results. WARNING: Risk of electric shock, fire hazards, and toxic fumes depending on what material you're working with. Dust from refractory brick should never be inhaled, as it can damage lungs and cause long term respiratory challenges. This project can reach temperatures in excess of 3,000ºF (1,648ºC) which is well beyond the melting point of hobbyists. Caution, care and expert planning are required to mitigate risks. Have fun, but always think ahead, and remember that every project you try is at your own risk. Project History & More Info: If you're wondering where you can get fire brick locally, try a quick Google search for “refractory materials” in your city. I called a couple of companies near me and asked if they'd sell to the general public. All of them said yes. If you can't find anything locally, try searching major hardwares stores online. They usually have inventory online that they don't carry in the stores. The insulating fire bricks I got were the 3” x 4.5” x 9” Alumina-Silicate Brick variety. I got a box of 10 for $33, effectively making them around $3.30 each. I went one step further and designed the furnace so that 2 of them could be made from one brick, cutting the cost in half, making each furnace a pro-rated $1.65 each! They're extremely lightweight, and capable of withstanding the temperatures used in steel working, but soft enough you can cut and carve them with kitchen utensils if you need to. In reading and studying history a bit, I learned that some of the earliest forms of light were made using carbon arc lighting. Large amounts of electricity were pumped through carbon rods, making a bright arc and providing light. To scavenge carbon electrodes, I took a lesson from NurdRage (youtube.com/NurdRage) a couple of years ago I saw his video on what could be scavenged from a carbon-zinc lantern battery (http://bit.ly/IBNurdRageBattery). It's useful to know what common everyday materials are made of, and these heavy duty batteries are containers packed with carbon rods, zinc metal, and manganese dioxide. I tucked the information in the back of my mind until now. In this project I tried melting the zinc casings from the lantern batteries, and casting them into a small ingot, formed with a mini muffin tray. Be cautious of the zinc oxide fumes produced. I haven't personally suffered any ill effects from working with it, but some people claim it can give flu like symptoms, or a fever if inhaled in large quantities. Zinc has a relatively low melting point 787.2°F (419.5°C), so the Arc Furnace is able to melt each casing into liquid zinc in around 5-10 seconds. That's amazing! I don't have an exact purpose for the zinc yet, but it's an easy metal to work with, easy to cast, and great to have on hand for a future projects. It's also one of the main metals used for making a simple carbon-zinc battery. The black stuff pulled out of the battery casings is manganese dioxide. It's a useful chemical for experiments with hydrogen peroxide, so it's worth hanging onto. Although I haven't verified it, I believe any stick welder can be used to power the mini arc furnace, and for most hobbyists, that would definitely be the easier and safer way to go. I just don't own a welder, so I used the one I made instead. You can see how to make it here: http://bit.ly/ARCWelder The longest I've run the unit continuously is around 3-4 minutes, and the electrodes get so hot at that point they can seriously burn your hands, or melt your gloves. I wouldn't recommend running it any longer than that.
wn.com/How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace
Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:47
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2011
  • views: 38213
videos
Jeff Pringle and Jim Austin are conducting a Viking-Age Bloomery Iron Smelt in West Oakland, CA. Iron oxide ore is reduced in the furnace to iron. Impurities are removed as molten slag by tapping. The result is a big bloom that can be forged and consolidated using traditional blacksmithing techniques.
wn.com/Making Viking Age Bloomery Iron In A Bloomery Furnace
Feeding the Celtic iron furnace  http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/

Feeding the Celtic iron furnace http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:55
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2010
  • views: 72090
videos
Thijs van de Manakker and his smelting team at an archaeological experiment in 1999 at the Prehistorisch Huis Eindhoven. Part 2 of 5
wn.com/Feeding The Celtic Iron Furnace Http Www.Thijsvandemanakker.Com
Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore www.ThijsvandeManakker.com

Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore www.ThijsvandeManakker.com

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:21
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2010
  • views: 287356
videos
Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore Part 1 of 5 Lejre Rapport: www.thijsvandemanakker. com/WeblogEnglish.htm
wn.com/Building A Celtic Iron Smelting Furnace And Roasting The Bog Ore Www.Thijsvandemanakker.Com
Bloomery - Ancient Mobile Furnace

Bloomery - Ancient Mobile Furnace

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  • Duration: 5:39
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2015
  • views: 13075
videos
A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. A bloomery consists of a pit or chimney with heat-resistant walls made of earth, clay, or stone. Near the bottom, one or more pipes (made of clay or metal) enter through the side walls. These pipes, called tuyères, allow air to enter the furnace, either by natural draught, or forced with bellows or a trompe. An opening at the bottom of the bloomery may be used to remove the bloom, or the bloomery can be tipped over and the bloom removed from the top. The ore is broken into small pieces and usually roasted in a fire to remove any moisture in the ore. Any large impurities in the ore can be crushed and removed. Since slag from previous blooms may have a high iron content, it can also be broken up and recycled into the bloomery with the new ore. In operation, the bloomery is preheated by burning charcoal, and once hot, iron ore and additional charcoal are introduced through the top, in a roughly one to one ratio. Inside the furnace, carbon monoxide from the incomplete combustion of the charcoal reduces the iron oxides in the ore to metallic iron, without melting the ore; this allows the bloomery to operate at lower temperatures than the melting temperature of the ore. As the desired product of a bloomery is iron which is easily forgeable, it required a low carbon content. The temperature and ratio of charcoal to iron ore must be carefully controlled to keep the iron from absorbing too much carbon and thus becoming unforgeable. Cast iron occurs when the iron melts and absorbs 2% to 4% carbon. Because the bloomery is self-fluxing the addition of limestone is not required to form a slag. The small particles of iron produced in this way fall to the bottom of the furnace, where they combine with molten slag, often consisting of fayalite, a compound of silicon, oxygen and iron mixed with other impurities from the ore. The mixed iron and slag cool to form a spongy mass referred to as the bloom. Because the bloom is highly porous, and its open spaces are full of slag, the bloom must later be reheated and beaten with a hammer to drive the molten slag out of it. Iron treated this way is said to be wrought (worked), and the resulting iron, with reduced amounts of slag is called wrought iron or bar iron. It is also possible to produce blooms coated in steel by manipulating the charge of and air flow to the bloomery. Early European bloomeries were relatively small, smelting less than 1 kg of iron with each firing. Medieval Europe saw the construction of progressively larger bloomeries, with a capacity of about 15 kg on average. The use of waterwheels to power the bellows allowed the bloomery to become larger and hotter. European average bloom sizes quickly rose to 300 kg, where they levelled off with the demise of the bloomery. As a bloomery's size is increased, the iron ore is exposed to burning charcoal for a longer time. When combined with the strong air blast required to penetrate the large ore and charcoal stack, this may cause part of the iron to melt and become saturated with carbon in the process, producing unforgeable pig iron which requires oxidation to be reduced into cast iron, steel, and iron. This pig iron was considered a waste product detracting from the largest bloomeries' yield, and it is not until the 14th century that early blast furnaces, identical in construction but dedicated to the production of molten iron, were recognized. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloomery
wn.com/Bloomery Ancient Mobile Furnace
C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:44
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2016
  • views: 1685
videos
Cast iron is made by re-melting pig iron, often along with substantial quantities of scrap iron, scrap steel, limestone, carbon (coke) and taking various steps to remove undesirable contaminants. Phosphorus and sulfur may be burnt out of the molten iron, but this also burns out the carbon, which must be replaced. Depending on the application, carbon and silicon content are adjusted to the desired levels, which may be anywhere from 2–3.5% and 1–3%, respectively. Other elements are then added to the melt before the final form is produced by casting
wn.com/C.I Casting In Cupola Furnace Part 1
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