• DIY Iron Furnace Build

    I made a small furnace for casting iron and stainless steel. It uses the same burner as my aluminum furnace but takes about 2 hours to heat up( a .75GPH nozzle is in the mail). If you wanted to save fuel simply coating ceramic blanket in santanite or Itc-100 might be better. I wanted something more robust, the refractory is very heavy and rated to 3000F. I should be able to push it a bit but the crucible won't quite cut it. I'll likely need one that's rated higher and can be capped and flooded with argon. Crucible - A10 Clay graphite (Purchased on ebay) Fuel- Start on propane, than switch to diesel I'm pretty happy with it and some of my castings have come out nice(video on that later) but they do rust quick unpainted. If you have any suggestions let me know. I got the Cast-O-lite...

    published: 06 Oct 2014
  • How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

    I have made another video on how to make the propane burner in this video click onto the link, http://youtu.be/l697pB9X5TI

    published: 19 Oct 2012
  • Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

    Making iron, Edwardian "bush" style. "A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. Iron ore melted in makeshift furnace. Tudor blast furnace: http://youtu.be/v46lzPosC1g?t=38m56s From Edwardian Farm: Charcoal burn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yK0rLQa3j4 For however long it lasts--the 'Edwardian Farm' and 'Victorian Farm' documentaries are available on this channel: BBC...

    published: 22 Jan 2011
  • Feeding the Celtic iron furnace http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/

    Thijs van de Manakker and his smelting team at an archaeological experiment in 1999 at the Prehistorisch Huis Eindhoven. Part 2 of 5 Next Part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjManty8sQg Previous Part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_mTgHj6M1Q http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/index.php/early-iron

    published: 29 Apr 2010
  • Homemade Furnace Part one: design and construction

    I build a new furnace so that I can hopefully melt iron. Next week I will upload videos of testing and operation of the furnace.

    published: 13 Jun 2014
  • Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

    Jeff Pringle and Jim Austin are conducting a Viking-Age Bloomery Iron Smelt in West Oakland, CA. Iron oxide ore is reduced in the furnace to iron. Impurities are removed as molten slag by tapping. The result is a big bloom that can be forged and consolidated using traditional blacksmithing techniques.

    published: 17 Jul 2011
  • C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

    Cast iron is made by re-melting pig iron, often along with substantial quantities of scrap iron, scrap steel, limestone, carbon (coke) and taking various steps to remove undesirable contaminants. Phosphorus and sulfur may be burnt out of the molten iron, but this also burns out the carbon, which must be replaced. Depending on the application, carbon and silicon content are adjusted to the desired levels, which may be anywhere from 2–3.5% and 1–3%, respectively. Other elements are then added to the melt before the final form is produced by casting

    published: 19 Feb 2016
  • How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

    How to hack flashlight batteries and a fire brick, into a desktop arc reaction chamber. ...For hobby metal melting, and for science! Some quick links to a few of the materials I used: [✓] Lantern battery: http://amzn.to/2cgnKxN [✓] Forstner Bit: http://amzn.to/2c1Ja3V [✓] 3/8 Drill bit: http://amzn.to/2cgl6rL Subscribe for new videos posted Randomly! https://goo.gl/618xWm Join my email list! http://bit.ly/TKOREmailList For other project videos, check out http://www.thekingofrandom.com Social Media Links: Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBTheKingOfRandom Instagram: https://goo.gl/C0Q1YU Business Inquiries: For sponsorship requests or business opportunities please contact me directly: http://www.youtube.com/thekingofrandom/about Endcard Links: Micro Welder: https://goo.gl/ZmccT9Laser Blo...

    published: 05 Mar 2015
  • Blast Furnace

    Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/inorganic-chemistry/metallurgy.html Blast Furnace Modern furnaces are equipped with an array of supporting facilities to increase efficiency, such as ore storage yards where barges are unloaded. The raw materials are transferred to the stockhouse complex by ore bridges, or rail hoppers and ore transfer cars. Rail-mounted scale cars or computer controlled weight hoppers weigh out the various raw materials to yield the desired hot metal and slag chemistry. The raw materials are brought to the top of the blast furnace via a skip car powered by winches or conveyor belts.There are different ways in which the raw materials are charged into the blast furnace. Some blast furnaces use a "double be...

    published: 03 May 2010
  • Melting cast iron for my projects

    This video shows how my waste oil furnace melts cast iron for castings I need. It also shows my pouring trolley, close up of my burner and my sand mixer.

    published: 07 Sep 2012
DIY Iron Furnace Build

DIY Iron Furnace Build

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:55
  • Updated: 06 Oct 2014
  • views: 500776
videos
I made a small furnace for casting iron and stainless steel. It uses the same burner as my aluminum furnace but takes about 2 hours to heat up( a .75GPH nozzle is in the mail). If you wanted to save fuel simply coating ceramic blanket in santanite or Itc-100 might be better. I wanted something more robust, the refractory is very heavy and rated to 3000F. I should be able to push it a bit but the crucible won't quite cut it. I'll likely need one that's rated higher and can be capped and flooded with argon. Crucible - A10 Clay graphite (Purchased on ebay) Fuel- Start on propane, than switch to diesel I'm pretty happy with it and some of my castings have come out nice(video on that later) but they do rust quick unpainted. If you have any suggestions let me know. I got the Cast-O-lite 30 off ebay + some mizzou plus for plinths and the 2600F ceramic blanket I made all the foundry tools with hardware store steel The 10 gallon barrel was free and stays touchable even when the pour is molten! This is really dangerous, the molten iron can go right through just about anything. Start with aluminum before going up to iron. The fumes are bad, the heat will melt flesh, the fuel tank could explode the crucible could rupture, the pour could hit water. You really need to be careful **Note about my shoes: They are made of leather, plus they can be kicked off super quick, plus I tested them by pouring some metal on them and it was not a big deal at all, so I wouldn't even need to. Its a small furnace in an open space that's really easy to run away from in the case of an accident such as a crucible rupture or spill, and no skin is exposed so I'm pretty safe from splatters. Also, all the clothing can be removed really quickly, witch matters most to me. Its surprisingly hard to get metal to pool up and burn through clothing, especially when you can shake around. And if it does just pull the clothing off as you run away. I haven't had any major injury's and have probably poured 100 times or so, I don't think its dumb luck any more. This is not a professional foundry where you can get trapped and there are thousands of pounds of molten metal around you. Danger scales, like everything else. Incandescent light bulbs get hotter than this, yes they burn down houses but you don't wear a fire suit in your kitchen.
wn.com/Diy Iron Furnace Build
How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:15
  • Updated: 19 Oct 2012
  • views: 379884
videos
I have made another video on how to make the propane burner in this video click onto the link, http://youtu.be/l697pB9X5TI
wn.com/How To Build A Small Cast Iron Melting Furnace.
Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:36
  • Updated: 22 Jan 2011
  • views: 26381
videos
Making iron, Edwardian "bush" style. "A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. Iron ore melted in makeshift furnace. Tudor blast furnace: http://youtu.be/v46lzPosC1g?t=38m56s From Edwardian Farm: Charcoal burn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yK0rLQa3j4 For however long it lasts--the 'Edwardian Farm' and 'Victorian Farm' documentaries are available on this channel: BBC Farm series: Tales from the Green Valley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSpqpwJ__Ek&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FUA6S_xLEwRkc6ygmij5xQ Tudor Monastery Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1ERDYjsHBg&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FUg-3jbfHILhh6JFtnj7uq Victorian Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5T2TU-Na_c&list=PLrYzzr8yja6F2f4_hxuK2T3pF8XgD82Zw Edwardian Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcBl4_2FJX4&list=PLrYzzr8yja6E-5y2gUvJNlI3eBobkbFs5 Wartime Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hou91pLDvDs&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FjTvB4yJp41J6-ebSJJ37Z
wn.com/Iron Furnace Bush Style Bloomery
Feeding the Celtic iron furnace  http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/

Feeding the Celtic iron furnace http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:55
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2010
  • views: 88472
videos
Thijs van de Manakker and his smelting team at an archaeological experiment in 1999 at the Prehistorisch Huis Eindhoven. Part 2 of 5 Next Part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjManty8sQg Previous Part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_mTgHj6M1Q http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/index.php/early-iron
wn.com/Feeding The Celtic Iron Furnace Http Www.Thijsvandemanakker.Com
Homemade Furnace Part one: design and construction

Homemade Furnace Part one: design and construction

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:21
  • Updated: 13 Jun 2014
  • views: 46564
videos
I build a new furnace so that I can hopefully melt iron. Next week I will upload videos of testing and operation of the furnace.
wn.com/Homemade Furnace Part One Design And Construction
Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:47
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2011
  • views: 64842
videos
Jeff Pringle and Jim Austin are conducting a Viking-Age Bloomery Iron Smelt in West Oakland, CA. Iron oxide ore is reduced in the furnace to iron. Impurities are removed as molten slag by tapping. The result is a big bloom that can be forged and consolidated using traditional blacksmithing techniques.
wn.com/Making Viking Age Bloomery Iron In A Bloomery Furnace
C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:44
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2016
  • views: 5860
videos
Cast iron is made by re-melting pig iron, often along with substantial quantities of scrap iron, scrap steel, limestone, carbon (coke) and taking various steps to remove undesirable contaminants. Phosphorus and sulfur may be burnt out of the molten iron, but this also burns out the carbon, which must be replaced. Depending on the application, carbon and silicon content are adjusted to the desired levels, which may be anywhere from 2–3.5% and 1–3%, respectively. Other elements are then added to the melt before the final form is produced by casting
wn.com/C.I Casting In Cupola Furnace Part 1
How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:41
  • Updated: 05 Mar 2015
  • views: 7349787
videos
How to hack flashlight batteries and a fire brick, into a desktop arc reaction chamber. ...For hobby metal melting, and for science! Some quick links to a few of the materials I used: [✓] Lantern battery: http://amzn.to/2cgnKxN [✓] Forstner Bit: http://amzn.to/2c1Ja3V [✓] 3/8 Drill bit: http://amzn.to/2cgl6rL Subscribe for new videos posted Randomly! https://goo.gl/618xWm Join my email list! http://bit.ly/TKOREmailList For other project videos, check out http://www.thekingofrandom.com Social Media Links: Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBTheKingOfRandom Instagram: https://goo.gl/C0Q1YU Business Inquiries: For sponsorship requests or business opportunities please contact me directly: http://www.youtube.com/thekingofrandom/about Endcard Links: Micro Welder: https://goo.gl/ZmccT9Laser Blowgun: https://goo.gl/lu3o0M Magic Mud: https://goo.gl/5dtyXPMatchbox Rockets: https://goo.gl/jguunj Music By: Scott & Brendo (“Photographs” - Instrumental) http://bit.ly/ScottBrendoiTunes Project Inspired By: This project was originally inspired by Theo Grey and his book, "Mad Science". After seeing the concept, I couldn't find any information anywhere on the internet or in libraries about arc furnace experiments, so I set out on my own to achieve these results. WARNING: Risk of electric shock, fire hazards, and toxic fumes depending on what material you're working with. Dust from refractory brick should never be inhaled, as it can damage lungs and cause long term respiratory challenges. This project can reach temperatures in excess of 3,000ºF (1,648ºC) which is well beyond the melting point of hobbyists. Caution, care and expert planning are required to mitigate risks. Have fun, but always think ahead, and remember that every project you try is at your own risk. Project History & More Info: If you're wondering where you can get fire brick locally, try a quick Google search for “refractory materials” in your city. I called a couple of companies near me and asked if they'd sell to the general public. All of them said yes. If you can't find anything locally, try searching major hardwares stores online. They usually have inventory online that they don't carry in the stores. The insulating fire bricks I got were the 3” x 4.5” x 9” Alumina-Silicate Brick variety. I got a box of 10 for $33, effectively making them around $3.30 each. I went one step further and designed the furnace so that 2 of them could be made from one brick, cutting the cost in half, making each furnace a pro-rated $1.65 each! They're extremely lightweight, and capable of withstanding the temperatures used in steel working, but soft enough you can cut and carve them with kitchen utensils if you need to. In reading and studying history a bit, I learned that some of the earliest forms of light were made using carbon arc lighting. Large amounts of electricity were pumped through carbon rods, making a bright arc and providing light. To scavenge carbon electrodes, I took a lesson from NurdRage (youtube.com/NurdRage) a couple of years ago I saw his video on what could be scavenged from a carbon-zinc lantern battery (http://bit.ly/IBNurdRageBattery). It's useful to know what common everyday materials are made of, and these heavy duty batteries are containers packed with carbon rods, zinc metal, and manganese dioxide. I tucked the information in the back of my mind until now. In this project I tried melting the zinc casings from the lantern batteries, and casting them into a small ingot, formed with a mini muffin tray. Be cautious of the zinc oxide fumes produced. I haven't personally suffered any ill effects from working with it, but some people claim it can give flu like symptoms, or a fever if inhaled in large quantities. Zinc has a relatively low melting point 787.2°F (419.5°C), so the Arc Furnace is able to melt each casing into liquid zinc in around 5-10 seconds. That's amazing! I don't have an exact purpose for the zinc yet, but it's an easy metal to work with, easy to cast, and great to have on hand for a future projects. It's also one of the main metals used for making a simple carbon-zinc battery. The black stuff pulled out of the battery casings is manganese dioxide. It's a useful chemical for experiments with hydrogen peroxide, so it's worth hanging onto. Although I haven't verified it, I believe any stick welder can be used to power the mini arc furnace, and for most hobbyists, that would definitely be the easier and safer way to go. I just don't own a welder, so I used the one I made instead. You can see how to make it here: https://goo.gl/H0FWxE The longest I've run the unit continuously is around 3-4 minutes, and the electrodes get so hot at that point they can seriously burn your hands, or melt your gloves. I wouldn't recommend running it any longer than that.
wn.com/How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace
Blast Furnace

Blast Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:06
  • Updated: 03 May 2010
  • views: 145672
videos
Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/inorganic-chemistry/metallurgy.html Blast Furnace Modern furnaces are equipped with an array of supporting facilities to increase efficiency, such as ore storage yards where barges are unloaded. The raw materials are transferred to the stockhouse complex by ore bridges, or rail hoppers and ore transfer cars. Rail-mounted scale cars or computer controlled weight hoppers weigh out the various raw materials to yield the desired hot metal and slag chemistry. The raw materials are brought to the top of the blast furnace via a skip car powered by winches or conveyor belts.There are different ways in which the raw materials are charged into the blast furnace. Some blast furnaces use a "double bell" system where two "bells" are used to control the entry of the raw material into the blast furnace. The purpose of the two bells is to minimize the loss of hot gases in the blast furnace. First the raw materials are emptied into the upper or small bell. The bell is then rotated a predetermined amount in order to distribute the charge more accurately. The small bell then opens to empty the charge into the large bell. The small bell then closes, to seal the blast furnace, while the large bell dispenses the charge into the blast furnace.A more recent design is to use a "bell-less" system. These systems use multiple hoppers to contain each raw material, which is then discharged into the blast furnace through valves These valves are more accurate at controlling how much of each constituent is added, as compared to the skip or conveyor system, thereby increasing the efficiency of the furnace. Some of these bell-less systems also implement a chute in order to precisely control where the charge is placed. The iron making blast furnace itself is built in the form of a tall chimney-like structure lined with refractory brick. Coke, limestone flux, and iron ore (iron oxide) are charged into the top of the furnace in a precise filling order which helps control gas flow and the chemical reactions inside the furnace. Four "uptakes" allow the hot, dirty gas to exit the furnace dome, while "bleeder valves" protect the top of the furnace from sudden gas pressure surges. When plugged, bleeder valves need to be cleaned with a bleeder cleaner. The coarse particles in the gas settle in the "dust catcher" and are dumped into a railroad car or truck for disposal, while the gas itself flows through a venturi scrubber and a gas cooler to reduce the temperature of the cleaned gas.The "casthouse" at the bottom half of the furnace contains the bustle pipe, tuyeres and the equipment for casting the liquid iron and slag. Once a "taphole" is drilled through the refractory clay plug, liquid iron and slag flow down a trough through a "skimmer" opening, separating the iron and slag. Modern, larger blast furnaces may have as many as four tapholes and two casthouses. Once the pig iron and slag has been tapped, the taphole is again plugged with refractory clay.The tuyeres are used to implement a hot blast, which is used to increase the efficiency of the blast furnace. The hot blast is directed into the furnace through water-cooled copper nozzles called tuyeres near the base. The hot blast temperature can be from 900 °C to 1300 °C (1600 °F to 2300 °F) depending on the stove design and condition. The temperatures they deal with may be 2000 °C to 2300 °C (3600 °F to 4200 °F). Oil, tar, natural gas, powdered coal and oxygen can also be injected into the furnace at tuyere level to combine with the coke to release additional energy which is necessary to increase productivity. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
wn.com/Blast Furnace
Melting cast iron for my projects

Melting cast iron for my projects

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:36
  • Updated: 07 Sep 2012
  • views: 81844
videos
This video shows how my waste oil furnace melts cast iron for castings I need. It also shows my pouring trolley, close up of my burner and my sand mixer.
wn.com/Melting Cast Iron For My Projects
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