• DIY Iron Furnace Build

    I made a small furnace for casting iron and stainless steel. It uses the same burner as my aluminum furnace but takes about 2 hours to heat up( a .75GPH nozzle is in the mail). If you wanted to save fuel simply coating ceramic blanket in santanite or Itc-100 might be better. I wanted something more robust, the refractory is very heavy and rated to 3000F. I should be able to push it a bit but the crucible won't quite cut it. I'll likely need one that's rated higher and can be capped and flooded with argon. *********** CRUCIBLE - Purchased on EBAY -A10 Clay graphite Fuel- Start on propane, than switch to diesel I'm pretty happy with it and some of my castings have come out nice(video on that later) but they do rust quick unpainted. If you have any suggestions let me know. I got the ...

    published: 06 Oct 2014
  • 500KG Iron melting furnace

    Guangzhou Candea Electromechanical Equipment Co., Ltd. Email:sales01@heating-machine.com Mobile/whatsapp:008618689432272 www.heating-machine.com http://candeaheater.en.made-in-china.com

    published: 22 Jan 2015
  • Primitive Technology: Forge Blower

    I invented the Bow Blower, a combination of the bow drill and forge blower to make a device that can force air into a fire while being easy to construct from commonly occurring natural materials using only primitive technology. I began by fanning a fire with a piece of bark to increase its temperature. It is this basic principle I improved on throughout the project. Next, I made a rotary fan from two pieces of bark that slot together at right angles to each other to form a simple 4 bladed paddle wheel about 20 cm in diameter and 5 cm tall. The blades of the fan were not angled and were designed only to throw air outwards away from the axle when spun. The rotor of the fan was made by splitting a stick two ways so it formed 4 prongs. The fan was then inserted into the prongs and the end las...

    published: 29 Jul 2016
  • Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

    Making iron, Edwardian "bush" style. "A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. Iron ore melted in makeshift furnace. Tudor blast furnace: http://youtu.be/v46lzPosC1g?t=38m56s From Edwardian Farm: Charcoal burn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yK0rLQa3j4 For however long it lasts--the 'Edwardian Farm' and 'Victorian Farm' documentaries are available on this channel: BBC...

    published: 22 Jan 2011
  • How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

    I have made another video on how to make the propane burner in this video click onto the link, http://youtu.be/l697pB9X5TI

    published: 19 Oct 2012
  • Making Iron In The Woods - Bloomery Furnace

    Smelting iron from iron ore using a bloomery furnace....by members of the Wealden Iron Research Group. The website for the Wealden Iron Research Group is http://www.wealdeniron.org.uk An application to join the Wealden Iron Research Group can be found on their website. My website is http://www.bucklehurstleather.co.uk

    published: 17 May 2016
  • Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

    Jeff Pringle and Jim Austin are conducting a Viking-Age Bloomery Iron Smelt in West Oakland, CA. Iron oxide ore is reduced in the furnace to iron. Impurities are removed as molten slag by tapping. The result is a big bloom that can be forged and consolidated using traditional blacksmithing techniques. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/nielsprovos Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/user/mintwart Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/NielsProvos Like me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NielsProvos

    published: 17 Jul 2011
  • Melting cast iron for my projects

    This video shows how my waste oil furnace melts cast iron for castings I need. It also shows my pouring trolley, close up of my burner and my sand mixer.

    published: 07 Sep 2012
  • Number 7 Blast Furnace

    A blast furnace is a type of metallurgical furnace used for smelting to produce industrial metals, generally iron, but also others such as lead or copper.

    published: 18 Aug 2016
  • How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

    How to hack flashlight batteries and a fire brick, into a desktop arc reaction chamber. ...For hobby metal melting, and for science! Some quick links to a few of the materials I used: [✓] Lantern battery: http://amzn.to/2cgnKxN [✓] Forstner Bit: http://amzn.to/2c1Ja3V [✓] 3/8 Drill bit: http://amzn.to/2cgl6rL Endcard Links: Micro Welder: https://goo.gl/ZmccT9 Laser Blowgun: https://goo.gl/lu3o0M Magic Mud: https://goo.gl/5dtyXP Matchbox Rockets: https://goo.gl/jguunj See What Else I’m Up To: Instagram: https://goo.gl/C0Q1YU Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBTheKingOfRandom Business Inquiries: For business and sponsorship inquiries please contact us directly: http://www.youtube.com/thekingofrandom/about WARNING: Risk of electric shock, fire hazards, and toxic fumes depending on what mat...

    published: 05 Mar 2015
  • Inagina: The Last House of Iron - PREVIEW

    Purchase: http://www.der.org/films/inagina.html Swiss archaeologist Eric Huysecom and cameraman Bernard Augustoni work with 13 master smelters to recreate the building of a traditional furnace for smelting iron in Mali. There has not been any traditional iron smelting in Africa since the 1960's, in part due to the importing of cheaper substitutes. The building of the furnaces and the work involved in the actual production is deeply entwined with ritual, symbolism and gender. This film describes in great detail every aspect of the event, from the selection of the site of the reconstruction - which is the oldest remaining furnace site in the region, last active in 1961 - to the final result. This is an important film for African Studies, Archaeology, Religion, Ritual, Technology and Gender....

    published: 09 Sep 2008
  • Tapping a Furnace

    A tapper opening a taphole in the side of an iron furnace. Using an oxygen lance.

    published: 30 May 2011
  • EAF Electric Arc Furnace

    E.A.F. Melting scrap steel in New Zealand. The arc is about 3000°Celcius and scrap steel is melted in three charges to get around 40 tonnes of steel to be further processed in the ladle furnace. The rods are from carbon and the arc current varies between 42,000 and 50,000 Ampères at around 300 Volts ac. Sound is loud, wise to turn your volume down.

    published: 24 Nov 2008
  • How to make a Large $50 Mini Homemade Metal Foundry Furnace Forge propane or charcoal DIY Pt.1

    Part 1 of how I made my large mini home foundry forge to melt Aluminum, Copper, Brass, Lead, Silver, & Gold... and to forge Iron & Steel. This design allows for use with charcoal or later adding a propane burner torch to make it gas powered. *PART 2 Lid & Blower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYOLxqN5P-k *PART 3 Crucible Tongs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pY4MGMaAtM *PART 4 First Firing & Aluminum Casting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFePTMkVtlk I made my blower air intake on the bottom to maximize efficiency and even heat distribution. $28 Professional A6 Clay Graphite Crucible $18 Plaster of Paris (2 gallons) $ 4 Bag Of Perlite FREE Play Sand (from sandbox) FREE Air intake tube (old recycled car intake) FREE 2x Plastic Planter Pots FREE Recycled Blower Motor Plas...

    published: 31 Mar 2016
  • DIY Electric Arc Furnace Melting Copper and Iron

    Check out the blog post: http://sciencewithscreens.blogspot.com/2015/05/experiment-32-arc-furnace.html This is the arc furnace I built with a friend, based mostly on The King of Random's plans. I melted some copper scrap and cast a Cu tile for my element collection. It took about four minutes to completely liquify. The sand is the standard play sand/ground cat litter mix. The white furnace body is a soft alumina fire brick. I also tried iron. It melted, but I burned myself a bit trying to pour it, so the pour was incomplete. Although TKOR's design is great, it still has a lot of room for improvement. For example, the furnace body and electrode holders get much too hot to handle through fireproof gloves when I try to melt iron. Check out the video documenting these important impro...

    published: 03 May 2015
  • Electric Furnace Review and Demonstration

    A demo and a bit of a review of my electric melting furnace For melting gold silver copper aluminium i have had it for a few years and its still working good, Check out some of my other videos and SUBSCRIBE if you like them, Thanks.

    published: 30 Jul 2016
  • Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore www.ThijsvandeManakker.com

    Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore. Part 1 of 5 Next Part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URxbEQs98Go http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/index.php/early-iron

    published: 06 Apr 2010
  • Bloomery - Ancient Mobile Furnace

    A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. A bloomery consists of a pit or chimney with heat-resistant walls made of earth, clay, or stone. Near the bottom, one or more pipes (made of clay or metal) enter through the side walls. These pipes, called tuyères, allow air to enter the furnace, either by natural draught, or forced with bellows or a trompe. An opening at the bottom of t...

    published: 14 Mar 2015
  • Molten Iron, from Blast Furnace.wmv

    published: 04 Jun 2011
  • طريقة صنع فرن محلي لزخرفة الفيرفورجيه وتذويب الالومنيوم Iron Furnace

    اقدم لكم طريقة صنع فرن لتشكيل وزخرفة الحديد المشغول بطريقة بسيطة جدا ومن مميزات الفرن يقوم بي تسخين الحديد في درجا عالية ليسهل على الحداد طرقة وتشكيله وإعطائه رونقا خاصا و يجعل من الحديد تحفة فنية رائعة ويمكن الاستفادة من الفرن في اعمال اخرى مثل تذويب الالمنيوم او النحاس او الزجاج ...................الخ وتعرف على المزيد من اعمالنا عبر موقعنا من هناhttp://www.fouadkh.com

    published: 28 Feb 2014
  • Exploring the abandoned Victoria Iron Furnace

    Checking out this old iron furnace located in Clarks Valley along Rt 325 in Dauphin county.

    published: 19 Oct 2015
  • The Cornwall Iron Furnace

    Founded in 1742 and in service until 1883, this furnace was saved after it was no longer needed unlike almost all other furnaces of this type. Today you can take a tour of the most complete cold blast charcoal furnace in the Western Hemisphere - the Cornwall Iron Furnace, located in Cornwall, Pa. For more information visit www.cornwallironfurnace.org Note: Photos (with the exception of one) for this video were used from state created websites.

    published: 01 Apr 2008
  • C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

    Cast iron is made by re-melting pig iron, often along with substantial quantities of scrap iron, scrap steel, limestone, carbon (coke) and taking various steps to remove undesirable contaminants. Phosphorus and sulfur may be burnt out of the molten iron, but this also burns out the carbon, which must be replaced. Depending on the application, carbon and silicon content are adjusted to the desired levels, which may be anywhere from 2–3.5% and 1–3%, respectively. Other elements are then added to the melt before the final form is produced by casting

    published: 19 Feb 2016
  • Blast Furnace

    Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/inorganic-chemistry/metallurgy.html Blast Furnace Modern furnaces are equipped with an array of supporting facilities to increase efficiency, such as ore storage yards where barges are unloaded. The raw materials are transferred to the stockhouse complex by ore bridges, or rail hoppers and ore transfer cars. Rail-mounted scale cars or computer controlled weight hoppers weigh out the various raw materials to yield the desired hot metal and slag chemistry. The raw materials are brought to the top of the blast furnace via a skip car powered by winches or conveyor belts.There are different ways in which the raw materials are charged into the blast furnace. Some blast furnaces use a "double be...

    published: 03 May 2010
developed with YouTube
DIY Iron Furnace Build

DIY Iron Furnace Build

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:55
  • Updated: 06 Oct 2014
  • views: 730607
videos
I made a small furnace for casting iron and stainless steel. It uses the same burner as my aluminum furnace but takes about 2 hours to heat up( a .75GPH nozzle is in the mail). If you wanted to save fuel simply coating ceramic blanket in santanite or Itc-100 might be better. I wanted something more robust, the refractory is very heavy and rated to 3000F. I should be able to push it a bit but the crucible won't quite cut it. I'll likely need one that's rated higher and can be capped and flooded with argon. *********** CRUCIBLE - Purchased on EBAY -A10 Clay graphite Fuel- Start on propane, than switch to diesel I'm pretty happy with it and some of my castings have come out nice(video on that later) but they do rust quick unpainted. If you have any suggestions let me know. I got the Cast-O-lite 30 off ebay + some mizzou plus for plinths and the 2600F ceramic blanket I made all the foundry tools with hardware store steel The 10 gallon barrel was free and stays touchable even when the pour is molten! This is really dangerous, the molten iron can go right through just about anything. Start with aluminum before going up to iron. The fumes are bad, the heat will melt flesh, the fuel tank could explode the crucible could rupture, the pour could hit water. You really need to be careful Consider supporting me and my projects on patreon! https://www.patreon.com/Bennbuilds **Note about my shoes: They are made of leather, plus they can be kicked off super quick, plus I tested them by pouring some metal on them and it was not a big deal at all, so I wouldn't even need to. Its a small furnace in an open space that's really easy to run away from in the case of an accident such as a crucible rupture or spill, and no skin is exposed so I'm pretty safe from splatters. Also, all the clothing can be removed really quickly, witch matters most to me. Its surprisingly hard to get metal to pool up and burn through clothing, especially when you can shake around. And if it does just pull the clothing off as you run away. This is not a professional foundry where you can get trapped and there are thousands of pounds of molten metal around you. Danger scales, like everything else. Incandescent light bulbs get hotter than this, yes they burn down houses but you don't wear a fire suit in your kitchen.
https://wn.com/Diy_Iron_Furnace_Build
500KG Iron melting furnace

500KG Iron melting furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:27
  • Updated: 22 Jan 2015
  • views: 3632
videos
Guangzhou Candea Electromechanical Equipment Co., Ltd. Email:sales01@heating-machine.com Mobile/whatsapp:008618689432272 www.heating-machine.com http://candeaheater.en.made-in-china.com
https://wn.com/500Kg_Iron_Melting_Furnace
Primitive Technology: Forge Blower

Primitive Technology: Forge Blower

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:32
  • Updated: 29 Jul 2016
  • views: 25131716
videos
I invented the Bow Blower, a combination of the bow drill and forge blower to make a device that can force air into a fire while being easy to construct from commonly occurring natural materials using only primitive technology. I began by fanning a fire with a piece of bark to increase its temperature. It is this basic principle I improved on throughout the project. Next, I made a rotary fan from two pieces of bark that slot together at right angles to each other to form a simple 4 bladed paddle wheel about 20 cm in diameter and 5 cm tall. The blades of the fan were not angled and were designed only to throw air outwards away from the axle when spun. The rotor of the fan was made by splitting a stick two ways so it formed 4 prongs. The fan was then inserted into the prongs and the end lashed to hold it in place. Spinning the fan rotor back and forth between the palms of the hands fanned the fire. But only some of the wind generated by the fan reached the fire. The rest of it was blowing in other directions, effectively being wasted. So I built a fan housing from unfired clay to direct the air flow into the fire. This was basically an upturned pot with a hole in the top, a spout coming out of the side. The housing was about 25 cm wide and 8 cm tall. The hole in the top and the spout were both about 6 cm in diameter so that the air coming in roughly equalled the air coming out. The base of the fan rotor sat in a wooden socket placed in the ground to make it spin easier and the top of the rotor protruded from the hole in the top of the housing. Now when the fan spun, air entered the hole in the top of the housing and exited the spout in the side. Importantly, it doesn’t matter which way the fan spins, air always goes into the inlet and out the spout. Air is thrown out towards the walls of the housing and can only leave through the spout while the vacuum in the centre sucks new air into the housing through the inlet. A separate clay pipe called a tuyere was made to fit over the spout to direct air into the coals. This was done because the pipe that touches the fire can melt away so it’s better to make this part replaceable. Instead of making a large wheel and belt assembly to step up the speed of rotation, I opted for a 75 cm long bow. I made a frame to hold the rotor in place consisting of two stakes hammered into the ground with a socketed cross bar lashed on to hold the top of the rotor. I made bark fibre cordage and tied the end to a stick. I then looped the cord around the rotor and held the other end in the same hand holding the stick. I then pushed and pulled the bow causing the rotor to spin rapidly, forcing air into the fire. I made a simple mud furnace for the blower. Then I collected orange iron bacteria from the creek (iron oxide), mixed it with charcoal powder (carbon to reduce oxide to metal) and wood ash (flux to lower the melting point) and formed it into a cylindrical brick. I filled the furnace with charcoal, put the ore brick in and commenced firing. The ore brick melted and produced slag with tiny, 1mm sized specs of iron through it. My intent was not so much to make iron but to show that the furnace can reach a fairly high temperature using this blower. A taller furnace called a bloomery was generally used in ancient times to produce usable quantities of iron and consumed more charcoal, ore and labour. This device produces a blast of air with each stroke of the bow regardless of whether it is pushed or pulled. The bow makes it possible to operate the blower without using a complicated belt and wheel assembly used in traditional forge blowers. There is a brief pause at the end of each stroke where the fan stops to rotate in the other direction, but this is effectively no different to the intermittent blast of a double acting bellows of Europe or box bellows of Asia. The materials used (wood, bark, bark fibre and clay) are readily available on most continents. No leather, valves or precisely fitted piston gaskets are required as with other types of bellows. The cords for this device wear out often so a number of back up cords should be kept handy for quick replacement. In summary, this is an easy to make device that solves the problem of supplying forced combustion air required for high temperature furnaces and forges. Wordpress: https://primitivetechnology.wordpress.com/ Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2945881&ty=h I have no face book page. Beware of fake pages.
https://wn.com/Primitive_Technology_Forge_Blower
Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

Iron furnace - bush-style bloomery

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:36
  • Updated: 22 Jan 2011
  • views: 28532
videos
Making iron, Edwardian "bush" style. "A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. Iron ore melted in makeshift furnace. Tudor blast furnace: http://youtu.be/v46lzPosC1g?t=38m56s From Edwardian Farm: Charcoal burn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yK0rLQa3j4 For however long it lasts--the 'Edwardian Farm' and 'Victorian Farm' documentaries are available on this channel: BBC Farm series: Tales from the Green Valley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSpqpwJ__Ek&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FUA6S_xLEwRkc6ygmij5xQ Tudor Monastery Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1ERDYjsHBg&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FUg-3jbfHILhh6JFtnj7uq Victorian Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5T2TU-Na_c&list=PLrYzzr8yja6F2f4_hxuK2T3pF8XgD82Zw Edwardian Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcBl4_2FJX4&list=PLrYzzr8yja6E-5y2gUvJNlI3eBobkbFs5 Wartime Farm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hou91pLDvDs&list=PLrYzzr8yja6FjTvB4yJp41J6-ebSJJ37Z
https://wn.com/Iron_Furnace_Bush_Style_Bloomery
How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

How to build a small cast iron melting furnace.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:15
  • Updated: 19 Oct 2012
  • views: 427970
videos
I have made another video on how to make the propane burner in this video click onto the link, http://youtu.be/l697pB9X5TI
https://wn.com/How_To_Build_A_Small_Cast_Iron_Melting_Furnace.
Making Iron In The Woods - Bloomery Furnace

Making Iron In The Woods - Bloomery Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:26
  • Updated: 17 May 2016
  • views: 263827
videos
Smelting iron from iron ore using a bloomery furnace....by members of the Wealden Iron Research Group. The website for the Wealden Iron Research Group is http://www.wealdeniron.org.uk An application to join the Wealden Iron Research Group can be found on their website. My website is http://www.bucklehurstleather.co.uk
https://wn.com/Making_Iron_In_The_Woods_Bloomery_Furnace
Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

Making Viking-Age Bloomery Iron in a Bloomery Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:47
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2011
  • views: 215959
videos
Jeff Pringle and Jim Austin are conducting a Viking-Age Bloomery Iron Smelt in West Oakland, CA. Iron oxide ore is reduced in the furnace to iron. Impurities are removed as molten slag by tapping. The result is a big bloom that can be forged and consolidated using traditional blacksmithing techniques. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/nielsprovos Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/user/mintwart Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/NielsProvos Like me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NielsProvos
https://wn.com/Making_Viking_Age_Bloomery_Iron_In_A_Bloomery_Furnace
Melting cast iron for my projects

Melting cast iron for my projects

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:36
  • Updated: 07 Sep 2012
  • views: 97661
videos
This video shows how my waste oil furnace melts cast iron for castings I need. It also shows my pouring trolley, close up of my burner and my sand mixer.
https://wn.com/Melting_Cast_Iron_For_My_Projects
Number 7 Blast Furnace

Number 7 Blast Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:04
  • Updated: 18 Aug 2016
  • views: 69159
videos
A blast furnace is a type of metallurgical furnace used for smelting to produce industrial metals, generally iron, but also others such as lead or copper.
https://wn.com/Number_7_Blast_Furnace
How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

How To Make An Electrical Arc Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:41
  • Updated: 05 Mar 2015
  • views: 9033201
videos
How to hack flashlight batteries and a fire brick, into a desktop arc reaction chamber. ...For hobby metal melting, and for science! Some quick links to a few of the materials I used: [✓] Lantern battery: http://amzn.to/2cgnKxN [✓] Forstner Bit: http://amzn.to/2c1Ja3V [✓] 3/8 Drill bit: http://amzn.to/2cgl6rL Endcard Links: Micro Welder: https://goo.gl/ZmccT9 Laser Blowgun: https://goo.gl/lu3o0M Magic Mud: https://goo.gl/5dtyXP Matchbox Rockets: https://goo.gl/jguunj See What Else I’m Up To: Instagram: https://goo.gl/C0Q1YU Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBTheKingOfRandom Business Inquiries: For business and sponsorship inquiries please contact us directly: http://www.youtube.com/thekingofrandom/about WARNING: Risk of electric shock, fire hazards, and toxic fumes depending on what material you're working with. Dust from refractory brick should never be inhaled, as it can damage lungs and cause long term respiratory challenges. This project can reach temperatures in excess of 3,000ºF (1,648ºC) which is well beyond the melting point of hobbyists. Caution, care and expert planning are required to mitigate risks. Have fun, but always think ahead, and remember that every project you try is at your own risk. Music By: Scott & Brendo (“Photographs” - Instrumental) http://bit.ly/ScottBrendoiTunes Project Inspired By: This project was originally inspired by Theo Grey and his book, "Mad Science". After seeing the concept, I couldn't find any information anywhere on the internet or in libraries about arc furnace experiments, so I set out on my own to achieve these results. Project History & More Info: If you're wondering where you can get fire brick locally, try a quick Google search for “refractory materials” in your city. I called a couple of companies near me and asked if they'd sell to the general public. All of them said yes. If you can't find anything locally, try searching major hardwares stores online. They usually have inventory online that they don't carry in the stores. The insulating fire bricks I got were the 3” x 4.5” x 9” Alumina-Silicate Brick variety. I got a box of 10 for $33, effectively making them around $3.30 each. I went one step further and designed the furnace so that 2 of them could be made from one brick, cutting the cost in half, making each furnace a pro-rated $1.65 each! They're extremely lightweight, and capable of withstanding the temperatures used in steel working, but soft enough you can cut and carve them with kitchen utensils if you need to. In reading and studying history a bit, I learned that some of the earliest forms of light were made using carbon arc lighting. Large amounts of electricity were pumped through carbon rods, making a bright arc and providing light. To scavenge carbon electrodes, I took a lesson from NurdRage (youtube.com/NurdRage) a couple of years ago I saw his video on what could be scavenged from a carbon-zinc lantern battery (http://bit.ly/IBNurdRageBattery). It's useful to know what common everyday materials are made of, and these heavy duty batteries are containers packed with carbon rods, zinc metal, and manganese dioxide. I tucked the information in the back of my mind until now. In this project I tried melting the zinc casings from the lantern batteries, and casting them into a small ingot, formed with a mini muffin tray. Be cautious of the zinc oxide fumes produced. I haven't personally suffered any ill effects from working with it, but some people claim it can give flu like symptoms, or a fever if inhaled in large quantities. Zinc has a relatively low melting point 787.2°F (419.5°C), so the Arc Furnace is able to melt each casing into liquid zinc in around 5-10 seconds. That's amazing! I don't have an exact purpose for the zinc yet, but it's an easy metal to work with, easy to cast, and great to have on hand for a future projects. It's also one of the main metals used for making a simple carbon-zinc battery. The black stuff pulled out of the battery casings is manganese dioxide. It's a useful chemical for experiments with hydrogen peroxide, so it's worth hanging onto. Although I haven't verified it, I believe any stick welder can be used to power the mini arc furnace, and for most hobbyists, that would definitely be the easier and safer way to go. I just don't own a welder, so I used the one I made instead. You can see how to make it here: https://goo.gl/H0FWxE The longest I've run the unit continuously is around 3-4 minutes, and the electrodes get so hot at that point they can seriously burn your hands, or melt your gloves. I wouldn't recommend running it any longer than that.
https://wn.com/How_To_Make_An_Electrical_Arc_Furnace
Inagina: The Last House of Iron - PREVIEW

Inagina: The Last House of Iron - PREVIEW

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:47
  • Updated: 09 Sep 2008
  • views: 21313
videos
Purchase: http://www.der.org/films/inagina.html Swiss archaeologist Eric Huysecom and cameraman Bernard Augustoni work with 13 master smelters to recreate the building of a traditional furnace for smelting iron in Mali. There has not been any traditional iron smelting in Africa since the 1960's, in part due to the importing of cheaper substitutes. The building of the furnaces and the work involved in the actual production is deeply entwined with ritual, symbolism and gender. This film describes in great detail every aspect of the event, from the selection of the site of the reconstruction - which is the oldest remaining furnace site in the region, last active in 1961 - to the final result. This is an important film for African Studies, Archaeology, Religion, Ritual, Technology and Gender. a film by Eric Huysecom, (Geneva) and Bernard Augustoni distributed by Documentary Educational Resources
https://wn.com/Inagina_The_Last_House_Of_Iron_Preview
Tapping a Furnace

Tapping a Furnace

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:41
  • Updated: 30 May 2011
  • views: 74298
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A tapper opening a taphole in the side of an iron furnace. Using an oxygen lance.
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EAF Electric Arc Furnace

EAF Electric Arc Furnace

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  • Duration: 3:17
  • Updated: 24 Nov 2008
  • views: 404607
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E.A.F. Melting scrap steel in New Zealand. The arc is about 3000°Celcius and scrap steel is melted in three charges to get around 40 tonnes of steel to be further processed in the ladle furnace. The rods are from carbon and the arc current varies between 42,000 and 50,000 Ampères at around 300 Volts ac. Sound is loud, wise to turn your volume down.
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How to make a Large $50 Mini Homemade Metal Foundry Furnace Forge propane or charcoal DIY Pt.1

How to make a Large $50 Mini Homemade Metal Foundry Furnace Forge propane or charcoal DIY Pt.1

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  • Duration: 4:17
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2016
  • views: 228193
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Part 1 of how I made my large mini home foundry forge to melt Aluminum, Copper, Brass, Lead, Silver, & Gold... and to forge Iron & Steel. This design allows for use with charcoal or later adding a propane burner torch to make it gas powered. *PART 2 Lid & Blower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYOLxqN5P-k *PART 3 Crucible Tongs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pY4MGMaAtM *PART 4 First Firing & Aluminum Casting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFePTMkVtlk I made my blower air intake on the bottom to maximize efficiency and even heat distribution. $28 Professional A6 Clay Graphite Crucible $18 Plaster of Paris (2 gallons) $ 4 Bag Of Perlite FREE Play Sand (from sandbox) FREE Air intake tube (old recycled car intake) FREE 2x Plastic Planter Pots FREE Recycled Blower Motor Plaster of Paris begins to cure as soon as you mix the water in it, hardening to an unworkable state in 3 minutes to as little as just 30 seconds, so plan ahead and Do Not mix more then you can evenly mix and pure in a few minutes! The extreme high heat associated with and risk of severe burns makes this extremely dangerous. Attempt at your Own risk! I am not a professional, just a hobbyist. UPDATE: DO NOT USE PORTLAND CEMENT, IT CAUSES THE FOUNDRY TO BREAK DOWN IN EXTREME HEAT! Goodluck & God Bless!
https://wn.com/How_To_Make_A_Large_50_Mini_Homemade_Metal_Foundry_Furnace_Forge_Propane_Or_Charcoal_Diy_Pt.1
DIY Electric Arc Furnace Melting Copper and Iron

DIY Electric Arc Furnace Melting Copper and Iron

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  • Duration: 3:39
  • Updated: 03 May 2015
  • views: 35116
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Check out the blog post: http://sciencewithscreens.blogspot.com/2015/05/experiment-32-arc-furnace.html This is the arc furnace I built with a friend, based mostly on The King of Random's plans. I melted some copper scrap and cast a Cu tile for my element collection. It took about four minutes to completely liquify. The sand is the standard play sand/ground cat litter mix. The white furnace body is a soft alumina fire brick. I also tried iron. It melted, but I burned myself a bit trying to pour it, so the pour was incomplete. Although TKOR's design is great, it still has a lot of room for improvement. For example, the furnace body and electrode holders get much too hot to handle through fireproof gloves when I try to melt iron. Check out the video documenting these important improvements here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJxRE15Fyi8
https://wn.com/Diy_Electric_Arc_Furnace_Melting_Copper_And_Iron
Electric Furnace Review and Demonstration

Electric Furnace Review and Demonstration

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  • Duration: 2:18
  • Updated: 30 Jul 2016
  • views: 9050
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A demo and a bit of a review of my electric melting furnace For melting gold silver copper aluminium i have had it for a few years and its still working good, Check out some of my other videos and SUBSCRIBE if you like them, Thanks.
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Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore www.ThijsvandeManakker.com

Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore www.ThijsvandeManakker.com

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  • Duration: 9:21
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2010
  • views: 449437
videos
Building a Celtic iron smelting furnace and roasting the bog-ore. Part 1 of 5 Next Part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URxbEQs98Go http://www.thijsvandemanakker.com/index.php/early-iron
https://wn.com/Building_A_Celtic_Iron_Smelting_Furnace_And_Roasting_The_Bog_Ore_Www.Thijsvandemanakker.Com
Bloomery - Ancient Mobile Furnace

Bloomery - Ancient Mobile Furnace

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  • Duration: 5:39
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2015
  • views: 30458
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A bloomery is a type of furnace once widely used for smelting iron from its oxides. The bloomery was the earliest form of smelter capable of smelting iron. A bloomery's product is a porous mass of iron and slag called a bloom. This mix of slag and iron in the bloom is termed sponge iron, which is usually consolidated (shingled) and further forged into wrought iron. The bloomery has now largely been superseded by the blast furnace, which produces pig iron. A bloomery consists of a pit or chimney with heat-resistant walls made of earth, clay, or stone. Near the bottom, one or more pipes (made of clay or metal) enter through the side walls. These pipes, called tuyères, allow air to enter the furnace, either by natural draught, or forced with bellows or a trompe. An opening at the bottom of the bloomery may be used to remove the bloom, or the bloomery can be tipped over and the bloom removed from the top. The ore is broken into small pieces and usually roasted in a fire to remove any moisture in the ore. Any large impurities in the ore can be crushed and removed. Since slag from previous blooms may have a high iron content, it can also be broken up and recycled into the bloomery with the new ore. In operation, the bloomery is preheated by burning charcoal, and once hot, iron ore and additional charcoal are introduced through the top, in a roughly one to one ratio. Inside the furnace, carbon monoxide from the incomplete combustion of the charcoal reduces the iron oxides in the ore to metallic iron, without melting the ore; this allows the bloomery to operate at lower temperatures than the melting temperature of the ore. As the desired product of a bloomery is iron which is easily forgeable, it required a low carbon content. The temperature and ratio of charcoal to iron ore must be carefully controlled to keep the iron from absorbing too much carbon and thus becoming unforgeable. Cast iron occurs when the iron melts and absorbs 2% to 4% carbon. Because the bloomery is self-fluxing the addition of limestone is not required to form a slag. The small particles of iron produced in this way fall to the bottom of the furnace, where they combine with molten slag, often consisting of fayalite, a compound of silicon, oxygen and iron mixed with other impurities from the ore. The mixed iron and slag cool to form a spongy mass referred to as the bloom. Because the bloom is highly porous, and its open spaces are full of slag, the bloom must later be reheated and beaten with a hammer to drive the molten slag out of it. Iron treated this way is said to be wrought (worked), and the resulting iron, with reduced amounts of slag is called wrought iron or bar iron. It is also possible to produce blooms coated in steel by manipulating the charge of and air flow to the bloomery. Early European bloomeries were relatively small, smelting less than 1 kg of iron with each firing. Medieval Europe saw the construction of progressively larger bloomeries, with a capacity of about 15 kg on average. The use of waterwheels to power the bellows allowed the bloomery to become larger and hotter. European average bloom sizes quickly rose to 300 kg, where they levelled off with the demise of the bloomery. As a bloomery's size is increased, the iron ore is exposed to burning charcoal for a longer time. When combined with the strong air blast required to penetrate the large ore and charcoal stack, this may cause part of the iron to melt and become saturated with carbon in the process, producing unforgeable pig iron which requires oxidation to be reduced into cast iron, steel, and iron. This pig iron was considered a waste product detracting from the largest bloomeries' yield, and it is not until the 14th century that early blast furnaces, identical in construction but dedicated to the production of molten iron, were recognized. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloomery
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Molten Iron, from Blast Furnace.wmv

Molten Iron, from Blast Furnace.wmv

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  • Duration: 2:13
  • Updated: 04 Jun 2011
  • views: 13307
videos
https://wn.com/Molten_Iron,_From_Blast_Furnace.Wmv
طريقة صنع فرن محلي لزخرفة الفيرفورجيه وتذويب الالومنيوم  Iron Furnace

طريقة صنع فرن محلي لزخرفة الفيرفورجيه وتذويب الالومنيوم Iron Furnace

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  • Duration: 8:31
  • Updated: 28 Feb 2014
  • views: 170803
videos
اقدم لكم طريقة صنع فرن لتشكيل وزخرفة الحديد المشغول بطريقة بسيطة جدا ومن مميزات الفرن يقوم بي تسخين الحديد في درجا عالية ليسهل على الحداد طرقة وتشكيله وإعطائه رونقا خاصا و يجعل من الحديد تحفة فنية رائعة ويمكن الاستفادة من الفرن في اعمال اخرى مثل تذويب الالمنيوم او النحاس او الزجاج ...................الخ وتعرف على المزيد من اعمالنا عبر موقعنا من هناhttp://www.fouadkh.com
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Exploring the abandoned  Victoria Iron Furnace

Exploring the abandoned Victoria Iron Furnace

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  • Duration: 11:49
  • Updated: 19 Oct 2015
  • views: 537
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Checking out this old iron furnace located in Clarks Valley along Rt 325 in Dauphin county.
https://wn.com/Exploring_The_Abandoned_Victoria_Iron_Furnace
The Cornwall Iron Furnace

The Cornwall Iron Furnace

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  • Duration: 2:08
  • Updated: 01 Apr 2008
  • views: 1533
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Founded in 1742 and in service until 1883, this furnace was saved after it was no longer needed unlike almost all other furnaces of this type. Today you can take a tour of the most complete cold blast charcoal furnace in the Western Hemisphere - the Cornwall Iron Furnace, located in Cornwall, Pa. For more information visit www.cornwallironfurnace.org Note: Photos (with the exception of one) for this video were used from state created websites.
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C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

C.I CASTING IN Cupola furnace PART-1

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  • Duration: 5:44
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2016
  • views: 45085
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Cast iron is made by re-melting pig iron, often along with substantial quantities of scrap iron, scrap steel, limestone, carbon (coke) and taking various steps to remove undesirable contaminants. Phosphorus and sulfur may be burnt out of the molten iron, but this also burns out the carbon, which must be replaced. Depending on the application, carbon and silicon content are adjusted to the desired levels, which may be anywhere from 2–3.5% and 1–3%, respectively. Other elements are then added to the melt before the final form is produced by casting
https://wn.com/C.I_Casting_In_Cupola_Furnace_Part_1
Blast Furnace

Blast Furnace

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  • Duration: 5:06
  • Updated: 03 May 2010
  • views: 196013
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Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/inorganic-chemistry/metallurgy.html Blast Furnace Modern furnaces are equipped with an array of supporting facilities to increase efficiency, such as ore storage yards where barges are unloaded. The raw materials are transferred to the stockhouse complex by ore bridges, or rail hoppers and ore transfer cars. Rail-mounted scale cars or computer controlled weight hoppers weigh out the various raw materials to yield the desired hot metal and slag chemistry. The raw materials are brought to the top of the blast furnace via a skip car powered by winches or conveyor belts.There are different ways in which the raw materials are charged into the blast furnace. Some blast furnaces use a "double bell" system where two "bells" are used to control the entry of the raw material into the blast furnace. The purpose of the two bells is to minimize the loss of hot gases in the blast furnace. First the raw materials are emptied into the upper or small bell. The bell is then rotated a predetermined amount in order to distribute the charge more accurately. The small bell then opens to empty the charge into the large bell. The small bell then closes, to seal the blast furnace, while the large bell dispenses the charge into the blast furnace.A more recent design is to use a "bell-less" system. These systems use multiple hoppers to contain each raw material, which is then discharged into the blast furnace through valves These valves are more accurate at controlling how much of each constituent is added, as compared to the skip or conveyor system, thereby increasing the efficiency of the furnace. Some of these bell-less systems also implement a chute in order to precisely control where the charge is placed. The iron making blast furnace itself is built in the form of a tall chimney-like structure lined with refractory brick. Coke, limestone flux, and iron ore (iron oxide) are charged into the top of the furnace in a precise filling order which helps control gas flow and the chemical reactions inside the furnace. Four "uptakes" allow the hot, dirty gas to exit the furnace dome, while "bleeder valves" protect the top of the furnace from sudden gas pressure surges. When plugged, bleeder valves need to be cleaned with a bleeder cleaner. The coarse particles in the gas settle in the "dust catcher" and are dumped into a railroad car or truck for disposal, while the gas itself flows through a venturi scrubber and a gas cooler to reduce the temperature of the cleaned gas.The "casthouse" at the bottom half of the furnace contains the bustle pipe, tuyeres and the equipment for casting the liquid iron and slag. Once a "taphole" is drilled through the refractory clay plug, liquid iron and slag flow down a trough through a "skimmer" opening, separating the iron and slag. Modern, larger blast furnaces may have as many as four tapholes and two casthouses. Once the pig iron and slag has been tapped, the taphole is again plugged with refractory clay.The tuyeres are used to implement a hot blast, which is used to increase the efficiency of the blast furnace. The hot blast is directed into the furnace through water-cooled copper nozzles called tuyeres near the base. The hot blast temperature can be from 900 °C to 1300 °C (1600 °F to 2300 °F) depending on the stove design and condition. The temperatures they deal with may be 2000 °C to 2300 °C (3600 °F to 4200 °F). Oil, tar, natural gas, powdered coal and oxygen can also be injected into the furnace at tuyere level to combine with the coke to release additional energy which is necessary to increase productivity. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
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